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What is MYR?

MYR, Malaysian ringgit.

What is MYR? It's Malaysian ringgit, RM, $.

Currency of Malaysia - ringgit.

In new business climate, Malaysian currency ringgit shines.

MYR as Malaysian ringgit

The Malaysian ringgit is the currency of Malaysia. It is divided into 100 sen. 100 sen = RM1, there are 1 sen, 5 sen, 10 sen, 20 sen, 50 sen coins as well as RM1, RM5, RM10, RM50 and RM100 bills. The most popular Malaysian ringgit conversion with Merrypenny money calculator is to convert USD to RM. The ringgit is issued by the Bank Negara Malaysia.

Currency fact sheet

Malaysia currency fact sheet.
Name Malaysian ringgit
ISO 4217 code MYR
Sign, symbol RM
Coin 5, 10, 20, 50 sen
Banknote RM1, RM5, RM10, RM20, RM50, RM100
Central bank Bank Negara Malaysia

More about...

More about the Malaysia money.

Once upon a time, there was a no such thing as money. Each person would provide for his own food clothing and shelter. Then the money was invented. It is money because the government says it is, and we trust the government. The notes and coins we use today are the money. The money we usually use are issued by the government or the central bank.

The first actual money to arrive in Malaysia was in the form of bronze coins brought by Chinese merchants. Eventually the Malacca Sultanate began to issue their own currency of gold, silver, and bronze coins. This in turn was replaced, as the colonial powers came to Malaysia, with each one introducing its own currency. Portuguese, Dutch, and English money have been the currency of Malaysia at one time or another. However, the first paper money was once again from the Chinese banks that had opened branches in Malaysia. During the rule of the Government of the Straits Settlements, the main forms of money were the Spanish Dollar, the Dutch Doit, and the Singapore merchant tokens. Eventually, after the departure of the British, Malaysia began circulating what we know now as the Malaysian Ringgit. It was originally called the Malaysian dollar and represented with the sign M$. Malaysia has even issued its own gold bullion called the Kijang Emas after the barking deer. The History Of Money In Malaysia.

Basically, there are now three forms of money in Malaysia: coins, paper currency and transaction account (cheques and credit cards).

Malaysia money currency coin.

Pictures of Malaysian money, currency and coins is rare on the Internet.

Exchange rates

What is Malaysian ringgit exchange rate today?

Bank Negara Malaysia

As Malaysia's Central Bank, established on 26 January 1959, Bank Negara Malaysia promotes monetary stability and financial stability conducive to the sustainable growth of the Malaysian economy.

The major role of the Central Bank of Malaysia is the prudent conduct of monetary policy, which has seen generally low and stable inflation for decades and thereby, preserving the purchasing power of the ringgit. The Bank is also responsible for bringing about financial system stability and fostering a sound and progressive financial sector.

As part of the Bank's emphasis on efficient work culture, effective and efficient delivery of services to stakeholders, including the public, has always been a top priority for the Bank. To promote the public better understanding of their rights, responsibilities, the opportunities and the associated risks and costs as a result of participation in the financial system, the Bank has taken measures to raise the level of financial literacy among consumers. Given today's sophisticated financial markets, products and services, the Bank has initiated its Consumer Education Programme nationwide to reach out to the masses. The public is advised to look carefully to differentiate the genuine money from the counterfeits. Malaysian money is difficult to forge because there is heavy penalty to copy or falsify the ringgit.

Converters and rates

Easy to use currency converters and fresh exchange rates every weekday.

Look for further information about the Malaysian ringgit by googling for malaysia currency.

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